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    Latest CPD programme

Events

 

 


 

Cycling knees: the weakest link by Dr David Hulse

 

Register to attend: Cycling knees: the weakest link here.  

 

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Date: Thursday 26th September 2019

Time: 19:30 – 21:00

Venue: Wimbledon Clinics, The Lodge, Parkside Hospital, 53 Parkside, Wimbledon, London, SW19 5NX

Fee: £20

No of places: 16

 

Tutor:

Dr David Hulse BSc(Hons) MSc FFSEM(UK)

Dr David Hulse works for Wimbledon Clinics as a Consultant in Sports and Exercise Medicine, with specialist interests in exercise-related leg pain and cycling injuries.

David’s main focus is to understand what the problem is, what it is that you want to achieve and how you can achieve this. This will involve getting a clear diagnosis (this might involve scanning you) and he will help you decide what is the best type of scan so you don’t pay for unnecessary investigations. David will then discuss with you your diagnosis and the severity of the problem so that he can explore and discuss what treatments options are available to you.

David is an expert in non-operative care and that will be his initial focus however if you do want to consider a surgical option or that looks like it may be the best option for you he can help you decide who is the best specialist for your problem. At Wimbledon Clinics we pride ourselves on having very low rates of patients requiring surgery as we have access to some of the best facilities providing non-operative care in the UK.

 


TO FIND OUT MORE & REGISTER CLICK HERE

 


 

Shoulder Injuries in Tennis. A whole body approach by Dr George Bownes

 

Register to attend: Shoulder Injuries in Tennis. A whole body approach here.  

 

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Date: Wednesday 2nd October 2019

Time: 19:30 – 21:00

Venue: Wimbledon Clinics, The Lodge, Parkside Hospital, 53 Parkside, Wimbledon, London, SW19 5NX

Fee: £20

No of places: 16

Tennis is a popular racket sport which regularly causes timeless shoulder injuries for professional and recreational athletes. Dr George Bownes will be discussing how successful treatment of these injuries is often not as simple as addressing the presenting shoulder complaint and often a holistic Sports Medicine approach to the athlete is required to reduce time loss and reoccurrence. Followed by Q&A with Dr George Bownes.

Fee: £20 per delegate

No. of places: 16

Provided:

  • Refreshments and a light snack
  • A CPD certificate for all attendees

 

Introducing Dr George Bownes BSc. BMedSci. BMBS. DipSEM. PG Cert. FFSEM.

Dr George Bownes works for Wimbledon Clinics as a Consultant in Sport and Exercise Medicine, providing management of acute and chronic musculoskeletal, tendon and bone stress injuries.

In addition, George provides diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound.

Having worked a great deal within the worlds of rugby and tennis – George works at Wimbledon for The Championships – he has vast experience in upper limb injuries. From working in endurance sport, he also has an interest in bone stress injuries

 

TO FIND OUT MORE & REGISTER CLICK HERE

 

 


Patellofemoral Pain Uncovered 1 day course @ The Royal London Hospital by Ms Claire Robertson, Wimbledon Clinics

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Register to attend: The role of proximal control in patellofemoral masterclass here.  

 

Date: Saturday, 5th October 2019

Time: 8.30 - 16.00

Venue: Barts Health NHS Trust, Royal London Hospital, Whitechapel Rd, London, E1 1BB

Fee: £150

No of places: 20

 

Tutor: Ms Claire Robertson MSc PGCE MCSP

This course aims to directly impact on the clinician's ability to assess and treat patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome, (PFP). The course is a mixture of theory, demonstrations and practical sessions, totally underpinned by evidence. There is a strong emphasis on clinical reasoning throughout.

Claire Robertson is a consultant physiotherapist in patellofemoral pain, at Wimbledon Clinics. She is actively involved in patellofemoral research, having published in many journals, including the American journal of Sports Medicine. She is currently writing up a number of papers following extensive research on the VMO, and she has also recently finished a research grant researching patellofemoral crepitus. Claire's niche clinical practice and passion for making her teaching relevant to clinicians together with her research activity places her perfectly to deliver this course.

 

 

TO FIND OUT MORE & REGISTER CLICK HERE


 

 

Patellofemoral Pain Uncovered 1 day course @ Royal United Hospitals Bath by Ms Claire Robertson, Wimbledon Clinics

 

Register to attend: The role of proximal control in patellofemoral masterclass here.

 

Date: Saturday, 16th November 2019

Time: 8.30 - 16.00

Venue: Bath NHS Trust, Combe Park, Avon BA1 3NG

Fee: £150

No of places: 24

 

Tutor: Ms Claire Robertson MSc PGCE MCSP

This course aims to directly impact on the clinician's ability to assess and treat patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome, (PFP). The course is a mixture of theory, demonstrations and practical sessions, totally underpinned by evidence. There is a strong emphasis on clinical reasoning throughout.

Claire Robertson is a consultant physiotherapist in patellofemoral pain, at Wimbledon Clinics. She is actively involved in patellofemoral research, having published in many journals, including the American journal of Sports Medicine. She is currently writing up a number of papers following extensive research on the VMO, and she has also recently finished a research grant researching patellofemoral crepitus. Claire's niche clinical practice and passion for making her teaching relevant to clinicians together with her research activity places her perfectly to deliver this course.

 

 

TO FIND OUT MORE & REGISTER CLICK HERE

 

 

 

 

 

 

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